Product Designer · UX UI Designer
bloombox_gv.jpg

Bloom Box

Sprint Team

Sprint Team

Aida Nogués

Antonio Toscano

Michelle Broczek

Pina García

Roser Cape

The Company & Long-term Goal

The Company & Long-term Goal

Bloom Box is an online flower shop aiming to offer their customers a unique and fun experience when purchasing customizable bouquets and flower arrangements.


Based on this, as a long-term goal, Bloom Box wishes to offer their customers...

“...a shopping experience that is as fresh and fun as the flower-boxes.”

Monday: Map

Monday: Map

User Research:

1. Surveys + Interviews: 

Our team reviewed the results of the qualitative & quantitative research –made to flower buyers and flower experts– and summarized important points.

2. Usability Test:

Two group members observed three group members navigating through the website.

Assumptions: 

The main pain-points we found were

· No confidence in what they're buying.

· No confidence in freshness.

· Not customization in buying.

· Lack of realness.

Questions:

We turned the assumptions into questions to start thinking about design opportunities. 

· Where can I see the product?

· How can I be sure the product is fresh?

· How can I be sure the process is fun?

· How do I know that the product exists?

Sprint Questions:

We selected the questions that need to be answered during the Sprint.

· Where is the product?

· How can I personalize my gift/flowers?

Journey Map:

We mapped the steps that move our chosen actors –new customers and current customers– to the final goal.

  HMW (How Might We) Questions:    1. Brainstorm:    Having mapped out the possible high-level tasks our customers need to carry out to reach their goal, we wrote questions that were meant to deconstruct the bigger problem and identify smaller focus areas in which we might be of assistance.  Completing this exercise individually allowed us to produce a high number of questions.   2. Sort:   Then we grouped them by similarity and we could identify several categories.   3. Vote:   Having two votes each, we chose our favourite HMW question:  HMW help customers decide on flowers?

HMW (How Might We) Questions:

1. Brainstorm: 

Having mapped out the possible high-level tasks our customers need to carry out to reach their goal, we wrote questions that were meant to deconstruct the bigger problem and identify smaller focus areas in which we might be of assistance.

Completing this exercise individually allowed us to produce a high number of questions.

2. Sort:

Then we grouped them by similarity and we could identify several categories.

3. Vote:

Having two votes each, we chose our favourite HMW question:

HMW help customers decide on flowers?

  Target-Customer & Step in Map:   Looking back at our map, it was clear that the area we wished to address was the ‘Customization’ step, and the target-customer we chose was the new customer.   We put the final HMW question on the pain-point area on the journey map.

Target-Customer & Step in Map:

Looking back at our map, it was clear that the area we wished to address was the ‘Customization’ step, and the target-customer we chose was the new customer. 

We put the final HMW question on the pain-point area on the journey map.

Tuesday: Sketch

Tuesday: Sketch

Lightning Demos:

Each one of us had to find two or three companies, websites or designs that contained interesting ways of handling customization.

While one of us was presenting his example in 3 minutes, an appointed note-taker was capturing each idea on a board.

  The Four Steps:    1. Notes:   In 20 min, we looked back at our notes so far: The long-term goal, the insights of the user research, the sprint questions, the journey map and the lighting demos.    2. Ideas:   In another 20 minutes, we jot down possible solutions individually using mind maps and doodles.   3. Crazy 8s:   Looking back at our mind maps and doodles, we draw again individually 8 sketches in 8 minutes, 1 per minute. Each sketch should capture a feature, a flow, a story or try variations of one idea.   4. Sketch:   In 30 minutes, each of us sketched a 3-panel self-explanatory storyboard figuring out the details of a possible solution for the customization process.   (Crazy 8s below)

The Four Steps:

1. Notes:

In 20 min, we looked back at our notes so far: The long-term goal, the insights of the user research, the sprint questions, the journey map and the lighting demos. 

2. Ideas:

In another 20 minutes, we jot down possible solutions individually using mind maps and doodles.

3. Crazy 8s:

Looking back at our mind maps and doodles, we draw again individually 8 sketches in 8 minutes, 1 per minute. Each sketch should capture a feature, a flow, a story or try variations of one idea.

4. Sketch:

In 30 minutes, each of us sketched a 3-panel self-explanatory storyboard figuring out the details of a possible solution for the customization process. 

(Crazy 8s below)

Wednesday: Decide

Wednesday: Decide

Art Museum:

We hang our 3-panel storyboards like in a gallery. Then we observed the designs in silent on an individual basis and refrain from judging the designs. The only thing we could do was writing clarifying questions on post-its placed below boards. 

  1. Heat Map:   Next, we had sticky red dots to highlight our favourite ideas or features.   2. Speed Critique:   The Decider (one person outside the team) looked at each design naming the core ideas, while the Scribe –one of us– was writing down the stand-out idea of each design on a post-it and placed it above the board.   Then, the team discussed each solution without the participation of the Creator. When the discussion ends,  the Creator is allowed to intervene and clarify.   3. Straw poll:   Everyone gets 2 dots each for a final vote.

1. Heat Map:

Next, we had sticky red dots to highlight our favourite ideas or features.

2. Speed Critique:

The Decider (one person outside the team) looked at each design naming the core ideas, while the Scribe –one of us– was writing down the stand-out idea of each design on a post-it and placed it above the board. 

Then, the team discussed each solution without the participation of the Creator. When the discussion ends,  the Creator is allowed to intervene and clarify.

3. Straw poll:

Everyone gets 2 dots each for a final vote.

  4. Super Vote:   In the event of a tie, the Decider makes the final decision on the design to implement.

4. Super Vote:

In the event of a tie, the Decider makes the final decision on the design to implement.

 And the winner is...

And the winner is...

  Storyboard:   Having decided on a design to adopt, it was time to develop it in more detail, visualizing it in action in the real world with the help of a storyboard.   We assigned an Artist and we chose together an opening scene: A boy wants to buy flowers for Mother's day.   The main idea was to imagine a scenario in which the user needed to use Bloom Box’s online services and follow him through the process, from the moment that triggered that need, until the finished product was ready to be purchased.

Storyboard:

Having decided on a design to adopt, it was time to develop it in more detail, visualizing it in action in the real world with the help of a storyboard. 

We assigned an Artist and we chose together an opening scene: A boy wants to buy flowers for Mother's day. 

The main idea was to imagine a scenario in which the user needed to use Bloom Box’s online services and follow him through the process, from the moment that triggered that need, until the finished product was ready to be purchased.

Thursday: Prototype

Thursday: Prototype

The GV Design Sprint recommends to prototype the final solution as high-fidelity as possible, but we decided to do the prototype without using technology as a creativity experiment for us and to try to go more wild.

1. Fake it:

We added details to the final solution to make it as realistic as possible. 

2. Divide roles:

Maker (Pina) - Create individual components; labour intensive.

Stitcher (Roser) - Collects everything and ‘stitches’ it all together; ensures consistency between elements. 

Writer (Aida) - Content writer.

Asset Collector (Antonio) - Finds photos and icons online to use.

Interviewer (Michelle) - Prepares questions and script on Thursday; interviews Friday.

Tips:

Time constraints - Limit your time as a motivator to get unstuck and move on until completion.

Anything can be prototyped - Anything, even using paper and scissors. 

Disposable - Don’t fall in love with your creation, if the user doesn’t like it, you’ll throw it out and start again. Fall in love with the user.

Things we did well

Things we did well

· Collaboration:

The only role that was somewhat removed from the actual making of the prototype was the Interviewer. The rest of the team was helping each other when needed.

  · To avoid getting stuck:    We used tactics –also during the week– to avoid getting stuck: deciding by voting, referring back to the long-term goal and performing crazy 2s, 3s or 4s.    · To finish in time:   With a solution that actually looked clean and simple to understand.

· To avoid getting stuck: 

We used tactics –also during the week– to avoid getting stuck: deciding by voting, referring back to the long-term goal and performing crazy 2s, 3s or 4s. 

· To finish in time:

With a solution that actually looked clean and simple to understand.

Things we could have done better

Things we could have done better

· Clearer decisions: 

Especially creating the storyboard, we should have expanded a little more on certain parts of the functionality. Because the next day, during the prototyping session, we had to think in important details we didn't thought about. 

· Better communication:

To avoid misunderstanding later on and some frustration stemming from it. E.g., we didn’t quite agree on the mechanics of some step such as how to select flower types and flowers.

Friday: Test

Friday: Test

Usability Test:

Time to sit some users in front of our paper-based interface and get some open and honest feedback.

Act 1: Friendly welcome.

Act 2: A series of general, open-ended context questions about the customer.

Act 3: Introduction to prototype.

Act 4: Detailed tasks to get customer reacting and responding to the website.

Act 5: A quick debrief to capture the customers overarching thoughts and impressions.

Five is the optimal number of users to interview, but we only could run three 15/20min long interviews.

  Debriefing, collecting and analyzing feedback:   In order to visualize what type of feedback we managed to get, we put our collective post-its on a board.  Then we proceeded to categorize the insights by type using dots:   · Red dot:  Features to iterate on.   · Green dot:  Something that worked well.   · No dot:  Something to keep in mind for now.   We grouped the post-its by their nature and identified which part of the functionality they referred to in order to identify our next steps to improve the interface.    Next steps:    The user was able to find the product and customize it, but part of the navigation flow was confusing for him.   We agreed we might have to go back to the HMW questions to rethink the specifics paint-points during the browsing. Also, some A/B testing should also be dona util the above points are tackled and ready to be tested again.       Note: I do not work for Bloom Box. This project was done as an educational experience at  Ironhack .

Debriefing, collecting and analyzing feedback:

In order to visualize what type of feedback we managed to get, we put our collective post-its on a board.

Then we proceeded to categorize the insights by type using dots:

· Red dot: Features to iterate on.

· Green dot: Something that worked well.

· No dot: Something to keep in mind for now. 

We grouped the post-its by their nature and identified which part of the functionality they referred to in order to identify our next steps to improve the interface. 

Next steps: 

The user was able to find the product and customize it, but part of the navigation flow was confusing for him. 

We agreed we might have to go back to the HMW questions to rethink the specifics paint-points during the browsing. Also, some A/B testing should also be dona util the above points are tackled and ready to be tested again. 

 

Note: I do not work for Bloom Box. This project was done as an educational experience at Ironhack.